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Primitive Technology II: Ancestral Skills

By |2020-05-31T14:43:04+02:00May 31st, 2020|

The Stone Age is the common denominator of mankind, and through experimental archeologythe relearning and replication of ancient skillswe take a step of discovery and understanding into this rich past. In this collection, drawn from the pages of the Bulletin of Primitive Technology, learn to create tools to fabricate more complex technologies; master the arts of the bow and arrow; build a shelter or fashion clothing from fibers or buckskin.

Coyote Wisdom: Healing Power in Native American Stories

By |2020-05-22T13:21:39+02:00May 22nd, 2020|

An in-depth look at the therapeutic and transformative powers of storytelling in Native American and other cultures- Explores how to create a healing state of mind using stories- Includes healing stories from Native American traditions and other cultures from around the world- By the author of the bestselling "Coyote Medicine"Stories are powerful sources of meaning that shape and transform our lives. We tell stories to track our process of personal and spiritual growth and to honor and respect the journeys we have made. Through stories we are provided with experiences of spiritual empowerment that can lead to transformation.In "Coyote Wisdom, " Lewis Mehl-Madrona explores the healing use of stories passed down from generation to generation in Native American culture and describes how we can apply this wisdom to empower and transform our own lives. A storytelling approach to transformation starts with how we were created and how we can re-create ourselves through the stories we tell. As we explore the archetypal characters and situations that populate the inner world of our stories, we can experience breakthroughs of healing and even miracles of transformation.This approach to healing through stories runs counter to the current model of modern psychology. The stories we tell about ourselves may model our lives, but by introducing new characters and plots, we can come to see ourselves in a new way. The author also draws upon the cultures of other indigenous peoples--the Maori, East Africans, Mongolians, Aborigines, and Laplanders--to illustrate the healing use of stories throughout the world.

Seven Arrows

By |2020-05-22T12:57:42+02:00May 22nd, 2020|

Seven Arrows is in many ways a monumental book. In addition to an understandable explanation of the workings of Medicine Wheels, it contains beautiful old Native American narratives. These are increased with a lot of speed, excitement, humour and insight. Seven Arrows is the first book to reveal the deep knowledge of the Medicine Wheel; The spiritual discipline and earth science that reflects the design and balance of a living universe.

Everyday Life of the North American Indian

By |2020-05-31T10:31:12+02:00May 22nd, 2020|

This book by the author of several outstanding studies of ancient peoples vividly recounts the story of the Native Americans — from their earliest beginnings as immigrants from the Asian mainland, to their lives as "captives" on U. S. government-authorized reservations. A story of great depth and perspective, Everyday Life of the North American Indian traces the subjects' various roles in the New World: as nomad, hunter, and farmer; as athlete, warrior, parent, and spouse; as medicine people, worshipper, artist, and craftsman. Enhanced with more than 100 illustrations, this comprehensive, highly readable book will be valued by students of American history and welcomed by all those intrigued by Native American culture.

Looking at Indian Art of the Northwest Coast

By |2020-05-22T15:42:31+02:00May 17th, 2020|

In Looking at IndianArt of the Northwest Coast worden de elementen van stijl geïntroduceerd; de mythen en legenden die de motieven vormen worden geïnterpreteerd; de stilistische verschillen tussen de belangrijkste culturele groeperingen worden gedefinieerd en geïllustreerd. Raven, Thunderbird, Orka, Beer: alle traditionele vormen zijn hier, behendig geanalyseerd door een professionele schrijver en kunstenaar die een diep begrip van deze krachtige cultuur heeft.

Looking at Indian Art of the Northwest Coast

By |2020-05-20T18:53:32+02:00May 17th, 2020|

In Looking at IndianArt of the Northwest Coast ,the elements of style are introduced; the myths and legends which shape the motifs are interpreted; the stylistic differences between the major cultural groupings are defined and illustrated. Raven, Thunderbird, Killer Whale, Bear: all the traditional forms are here, deftly analyzed by a professional writer and artist who has a deep understanding of this powerful culture.

Indian Fishing

By |2020-05-31T09:39:01+02:00May 10th, 2020|

Of the many resources available to the First Nations of the Northwest Coast, the most vital was fish. The people devised ingenious ways of catching the different species of fish, creating a technology vastly different from that of today's industrial world. With attention to clarity and detail, Hilary Stewart illustates their hooks, lines, sinkers, lures, floats, clubs, spears, harpoons, nets, traps, rakes, and gaffs, showing how these were made and used-in over 450 drawings and 75 photographs. She has gathered material from major museums and from the old people in coastal villages and fish camps. One section demonstrates how the catch was butchered, cooked, rendered, and preserved. The spiritual aspects of fishing are described as well--prayers and ceremonies in gratitude and honour to the fish, customs and taboos indicating the people's respect for this life-giving resource. The fish designs on household and ceremonial objects are depicted--images that tell of fishing's importance to the whole culture.

Stone, Bone, Antler, and Shell

By |2020-05-31T09:33:34+02:00May 10th, 2020|

This book is for anyone who has looked at artifacts from the Northwest Coast in a museum and wondered: "How were these made?" "What was their function?" "How were they used?" Hilary Stewart lifts artifacts out of their isolation in a glass case and puts them into the context of the life of early native people on the coast. Archaeological excavations, or "digs, " have unearthed an array of ancient artifacts. While items made of perishable materials such as wood, bark and hide usually decayed over time, many objects of stone, bone, antler and shell have been found. In clear, easy to read text and over 1000 illustrations and 50 photos, Hilary Stewart depicts a wide range of artifacts. These tools, weapons, hunting and fishing gear, household and ceremonial items and ornaments reveal much about a people's way of life: how they fed, clothed, adorned and housed themselves; their technologies, skills and art; their trading and travelling patterns.

Cedar

By |2020-05-30T23:43:07+02:00May 10th, 2020|

From the giant cedar of the rainforest came a wealth of raw materials vital to the way of life, art and culture of the early First Nations people of the Northwest Coast. All parts of the cedar tree had many uses. From the wood, skilled men made ocean-going canoes, massive post-and-beam houses, monumental carved poles that declared history, rights and lineage, and powerful dance masks. Women dextrously wove the inner bark into mats and baskets, plied it into cordage and netting or processed it into soft, warm, water-repellent clothing. They also made the strong withes into heavy-duty rope and wove the roots into watertight baskets. Hilary Stewart explains, through her vivid descriptions, 550 detailed drawings and 50 photographs, the tools and techniques used, as well as the superbly crafted objects and their uses - all in the context of daily and ceremonial life. Anecdotes, oral history and the accounts of early explorers, traders, missionaries and native elders highlight the text.