Het Prentenboek is an extensive reference for adults on the footprints of mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles and invertebrates found in northwest Europe. In the 452-page book, the prints of more than 100 species are treated with more than 700 photographs and over 350 drawings.
Het Prentenboek was created by René Nauta and Aaldrik Pot. They have been working on it for more than three years, but actually it has more than forty years of experience in the search for prints and traces.

Het Prentenboek - No Trace Book recommendations
Het Prentenboek is an extensive reference for adults on the footprints of mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles and invertebrates found in northwest Europe. In the 452-page book, the prints of more than 100 species are treated with more than 700 photographs and over 350 drawings. Het Prentenboek was created by René Nauta and Aaldrik Pot. They have been working on it for more than three years, but actually it has more than forty years of experience…

HP’s design
We begin with a general introduction to Chapter 1.
How have the different feet all developed, what are you looking for prints, how do you look at a found print? What is a ‘metatarsal cushion’ and what is ‘negative space’? All this kind of explanation and knowledge is in Chapter 2.

Chapter 3 is the core of HP, in which we show the prints of mammals, birds, reptiles/amphibians and invertebrates.

In chapter 4, we explain the ways of walking; step, trot, jump gallop, gallop, jump and hop.

Chapter 5 deals with materials and resources; how do you take good photos and drawings? In what ways can you collect prints even more, such as soot plates, plaster and ink prints, spore beds, etc.

In chapter 6 we look at applications in the field, how are prints to be used for research and monitoring? We briefly go into ‘trailing’; following a fresh trail.

In chapter 7 we will go into education and give all kinds of tips.
In the final chapters include a photo account, literature list, links, etc.

Chapter 3 is, as i said, the core of the book. The prints of mammals are treated most extensively with approximately four pages for each species (about 40 in total). In addition to a description of the species, the characteristics of the front and the hind quarters are discussed. Then there is a series of six pictures of ‘prints from the field’, on different surfaces. Finally, there is a comparison page between species whose prints are very similar.
The footprints of a large number of bird species or bird groups are also extensively covered. Of the amphibians, reptiles and invertebrates, the most common prints and walking tracks are treated. And here, too, attention is always paid to the confusion and differences between the different species.